Introduction

Market revolution in the United States of America was associated with various positive and negative effects in the nation although the positive impacts seem to outweigh the negative ones. The market revolution for example brought about change in the labor systems as technology was employed in most activities of the economy making work easier.

It is also an aspect of industrialization and therefore brought change in the commerce sector through employment of advanced technology and improvement in the communication and transport infrastructure and the ultimate result was the general improvement of the nation’s economy (Brinkley 25).

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This paper discusses the fact that although the market revolution in the United States had its drawbacks, it was an unmitigated good for the American people due to the major positive impacts linked with it.

Impacts of the Market Revolution in America

Since I support the fact that the market revolution was an unmitigated good for the American people, I will concentrate on its positive impacts to the people and the nation at large. According to (Spark Notes 1) the pre-civil war period in America was marked by a lot of changes in different sectors of the economy for example there were political change, industrial revolution, technological developments and also economical growth including improvement in farming and manufacturing sectors.

Towards the end of the eighteenth century, the United States of America was not under the Britain governance and had its freedom and could decide on various issues for instance industrial goods and agricultural products like cotton.

There was a change from an agrarian economy to an industrial or knowledge economy. There was creation of employment in the factories and industries for example the textile mills. The cotton gin invention also made the harvesting and production of cotton easy.

Agriculture was also enhanced through invention of things like the steel plow to substitute the oxen-driven plows and mechanical mower reapers that eased wheat farming. Banking was also another aspect associated with market revolution and it helped improve the lives of people through investments and savings and in the long run improved the commerce sector and the economy at large.

The development and advancement in the transport sector for example the steamboat, railways, canals and roads enhanced movement of people, goods and information from one place to another through cost reduction and time saving hence promoting local and international trade. Improvement in communication was also experienced for example the invention of telegraph that enhanced quick communication within the nation and also between the nation and other nations.

Market revolution also brought about cultural and religious reforms by touching on aspects like sexual transgression, breaking the Sabbath rules and drinking with an aim of attaining moral perfectibility among the people through groups like the women rights’ movements (Lauritz 4).

Conclusion

The market revolution in the United States is a major event in the American history as it is viewed as a major contributor of the growth and development of the nation’s economy to its present position.

This is due to the positive economic aspects it came along with for instance attractive opportunities that enhanced living conditions, and also acting as a driving force for other developments like communication and transport revolution, increased job opportunities and enhanced service delivery. One of the negative impacts of negative revolution was the overproduction which exceeded the demand and hence lowering the products prices and wage rates.

Works Cited

Brinkley, Alan. American History: A Survey. Boston: McGraw-Hill College, 1999.

Lauritz, John. The Market Revolution in America: Liberty, Ambition, and the Eclipse of the Common Good. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Spark Notes. “The Pre-Civil War Era (1815–1850).” SparkNotes LLC, 2010. 12 Jan. 2011.